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How to recruit, hire and train an auditor

In Internal Auditing, ISO 19011, Supplier Audit, Supplier Audits, Supplier Qualification on December 22, 2012 at 7:57 pm

Part 1: Recruiting

Stop begging people to help you audit. Learn how to recruit auditors more effectively.

Stop begging people to help you audit. Learn how to recruit auditors more effectively.

Nearly 100% of the people I train as auditors were not hired specifically to be auditors. Instead, auditing is something extra that they were asked to do in addition to their regular job. This situation creates three problems for the audit program manager:

  1. you have difficulty getting enough people to perform the audits;
  2. most auditors will come from your department, so who is going to audit you; and
  3. the auditors have little or no motivation to get better at auditing.

Stop begging for “volunteers” from other departments and start recruiting.

My favorite holiday song of all time! I sing this to myself in car rides during July.

When I am recruiting someone to audit, I always get asked two questions:

  1. Who/What will I be auditing?
  2. What will I have to do?

You need to motivate people to become auditors, because it requires extra work. The answer to #2 should be specific. I recommend creating a “sell sheet” that explains the process of performing an audit. I also like to create sell sheets that are educational. Therefore, I recommend adapting the flow chart in ISO 19011:2011 (Figure 2 on page 15). I would add time estimates for each step of the process (6.2 – 6.7). This will serve as a training tool for future auditors, and it will eliminate the fear of unknown time commitment for your potential recruit.

In order to answer #1, I recommend you assign the recruit processes that are upstream and downstream. I have recommended this concept in previous postings, but essentially you are assigning the person to audits of internal suppliers and internal customers. By doing this, utilizing the process approach will be more natural to the auditor and they will have a vested interest in doing a thorough audit. This also creates a situation where the auditor is typically assigned to at least two process audits per year.

The next question is one that your potential recruit will never ask, but they are always thinking it…

Why should I become an auditor?

The biggest reason why you want to be an auditor is that it will make you more valuable to the company.

Auditors are required to interview department managers and ask tough questions. This gives the auditor a better understanding of the organization as a whole, and it gives them insight into how other managers work. This insight is pure gold.

If you want to be effective and get promoted, you need to demonstrate value to your boss and top management. If you don’t understand what other departments need, how can you help them? No manager will promote a selfish, power-hungry hog. They promote team players that make others better. Auditing gives you the insight necessary to understand how you can do that.

Auditing other departments will also give you insider information as to where new job openings will be. Sometimes you can’t wait for your boss to get promoted. In that case, you might want to know more about other departments in your company.

Each corporate culture is different, but the audit program manager needs to “sell” the recruit on volunteering to be an auditor.

Where to find recruits

Due to the cross-functional nature of auditing, I have found that my own personal experience working in multiple departments was invaluable. I have a better understanding of how a department functions than other auditors, because I have worked in that department at another company. Operations, engineering and research experience are extremely valuable for auditing, but I think the experience that transfers the best to auditing is service.

If your company is large enough to hire full-time auditors, I recommend searching for potential auditors at your suppliers and their competitors. These people will bring unique knowledge that is critical to a successful supplier selection process, and these individuals will increase the diversity in your company—instead of duplicating knowledge and expertise.

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This blog started as a single posting intended to help a Compliance Manager in the Twin Cities. Unfortunately, I ran out of time to finish the blog and it has been a couple of weeks since my last post. When I restarted the blog this weekend, I realized that the blog was much too long. Therefore, this is part 1 of 3. Part 2 will be about hiring auditors, and part 3 will be about training auditors.

For those of you that want to learn more, I am teaching a course with Brigid Glass in April. The course is designed specifically for audit program managers—not for inexperienced auditors. It will be a two-day course, and we are offering the course in three different cities: San Diego, CA (April 11/12), Orlando, FL (April 15/16) and Las Vegas, NV (April 17/18). Please Contact Me if you would like to learn more about the course.

Click Here

I am also teaching a one-hour, audio seminar with FX Conferences on January 9th:

“Are Your Suppliers Qualified? Prove It.”

This seminar will cover the areas of supplier qualification, supplier evaluation and supplier auditing. We already have a large number of companies signed-up for the seminar, and I am looking forward to having you join us.

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